Trusted Attorney for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Proceedings in Idaho

A Bankruptcy Law Firm Serving the Treasure Valley – Joe Frick Law, PLLC

A Chapter 7 bankruptcy is no laughing matter – it is your financial future. Handled badly, it could devastate the lives of you and your dependents. If it is handled well, however, there is no need to panic, and there is no need to worry that you won’t be able to feed your family or pay your rent. Indeed, a Chapter 7 bankruptcy could represent a welcome fresh start in your life.

Essentially, Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a tradeoff – liquidation of your non-exempt assets in exchange for a debt discharge. Although your case will be adjudicated under federal law by a federal court, Idaho law applies in some instances, such as the types of exemptions for which you are eligible. A bankruptcy case can become complex, however, even if your debts and assets are few.

Bankruptcy court is no place to “go it alone”

To maximize your chances of fully protecting your interests, you will need an experienced bankruptcy attorney at your side. Joe Frick Law, PLLC can provide the missing piece needed to complete your bankruptcy puzzle. With offices in Nampa and Boise, we accept cases throughout the Treasure Valley and elsewhere in Idaho.

We will aggressively represent you, meticulously organize your case to make sure that none of your eligible debts will be left out, and ensure that you receive the maximum in Idaho bankruptcy exemptions so that you can keep as much of your property as possible. Most of all, we absolutely will not allow your creditors to take advantage of your distress.

Personalized Bankruptcy Counseling

In addition to helping you with the mechanics of filing for bankruptcy, we can use our understanding of the law to help you decide which option is right for you under your individual circumstances. In some cases, for example, Chapter 13 bankruptcy might be a better option, while in other cases private renegotiation of your debts with individual creditors might be the way to go.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy FAQs

What is the difference between a Chapter 7 and a Chapter 13 bankruptcy?

In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, your assets are liquidated to pay creditors, and you then receive a discharge of your unsecured debts even if they have not been fully paid. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you renegotiate your debt repayment plan and pay off your debts over three to five years.

 

Are any of my assets exempt from a Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Yes. Although Idaho has opted out of federal bankruptcy exemptions, Idaho exemptions do apply. Among these exemptions are:

  • The homestead exemption (up to $100,000 of your home equity)
  • Alimony and child support
  • Motor vehicle equity up to $7,000
  • One gun up to a value of $750
  • Household goods and furnishings up to a value of $7,500
  • Public assistance and social security
  • Many more items
Can I discharge all of my debts in Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Not necessarily. Certain debts cannot be discharged. Non-dischargeable debts include most secured debts, most student loans, alimony and child support, certain tax debts, and debts arising from fraudulent activity (such as writing a bad check).

 

Can my creditors come after me during Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceedings?

No, not as long as your bankruptcy petition is accepted by the court (sometimes it isn’t – please see below). Once the court accepts your petition, it will issue an automatic stay that suspends collection action by any creditor that has been included in your bankruptcy.

Can my Chapter 7 bankruptcy petition be rejected by the bankruptcy court?

Yes, your Chapter 7 petition can be rejected if, for example:

  • You have received a Chapter 7 discharge within the last eight years
  • You have received a Chapter 12 or Chapter 13 discharge within the last six years
  • You had another Chapter 7 petition dismissed within the last 180 days
  • Your income is too high

Take Action Today

Joe Frick Law, PLLC is a small law firm. Because of this, we understand that you are an individual with unique needs and concerns – not just a case number. If you retain our experienced lawyers, you can be sure that we will give you and your case all of the individual attention it requires. Since every case is different, we will craft a solution to your financial problems that is just as unique as you are, instead of a “one size fits all” case strategy.

We won’t play games with your financial future, and we know exactly how to stand up to bullying creditors. If you are considering filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in the Treasure Valley or elsewhere in Idaho, contact us online or call us at 208-401-9311 today so that we can schedule a free initial evaluation of your case.

A Bankruptcy Law Firm Serving the Treasure Valley – Joe Frick Law, PLLC

A Chapter 7 bankruptcy is no laughing matter – it is your financial future. Handled badly, it could devastate the lives of you and your dependents. If it is handled well, however, there is no need to panic, and there is no need to worry that you won’t be able to feed your family or pay your rent. Indeed, a Chapter 7 bankruptcy could represent a welcome fresh start in your life.

Essentially, Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a tradeoff – liquidation of your non-exempt assets in exchange for a debt discharge. Although your case will be adjudicated under federal law by a federal court, Idaho law applies in some instances, such as the types of exemptions for which you are eligible. A bankruptcy case can become complex, however, even if your debts and assets are few.

Bankruptcy court is no place to “go it alone”

To maximize your chances of fully protecting your interests, you will need an experienced bankruptcy attorney at your side. Joe Frick Law, PLLC can provide the missing piece needed to complete your bankruptcy puzzle. With offices in Nampa and Boise, we accept cases throughout the Treasure Valley and elsewhere in Idaho.

We will aggressively represent you, meticulously organize your case to make sure that none of your eligible debts will be left out, and ensure that you receive the maximum in Idaho bankruptcy exemptions so that you can keep as much of your property as possible. Most of all, we absolutely will not allow your creditors to take advantage of your distress.

Personalized Bankruptcy Counseling

In addition to helping you with the mechanics of filing for bankruptcy, we can use our understanding of the law to help you decide which option is right for you under your individual circumstances. In some cases, for example, Chapter 13 bankruptcy might be a better option, while in other cases private renegotiation of your debts with individual creditors might be the way to go.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy FAQs

What is the difference between a Chapter 7 and a Chapter 13 bankruptcy?

In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, your assets are liquidated to pay creditors, and you then receive a discharge of your unsecured debts even if they have not been fully paid. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you renegotiate your debt repayment plan and pay off your debts over three to five years.

 

Are any of my assets exempt from a Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Yes. Although Idaho has opted out of federal bankruptcy exemptions, Idaho exemptions do apply. Among these exemptions are:

  • The homestead exemption (up to $100,000 of your home equity)
  • Alimony and child support
  • Motor vehicle equity up to $7,000
  • One gun up to a value of $750
  • Household goods and furnishings up to a value of $7,500
  • Public assistance and social security
  • Many more items
Can I discharge all of my debts in Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Not necessarily. Certain debts cannot be discharged. Non-dischargeable debts include most secured debts, most student loans, alimony and child support, certain tax debts, and debts arising from fraudulent activity (such as writing a bad check).

 

Can my creditors come after me during Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceedings?

No, not as long as your bankruptcy petition is accepted by the court (sometimes it isn’t – please see below). Once the court accepts your petition, it will issue an automatic stay that suspends collection action by any creditor that has been included in your bankruptcy.

Can my Chapter 7 bankruptcy petition be rejected by the bankruptcy court?

Yes, your Chapter 7 petition can be rejected if, for example:

  • You have received a Chapter 7 discharge within the last eight years
  • You have received a Chapter 12 or Chapter 13 discharge within the last six years
  • You had another Chapter 7 petition dismissed within the last 180 days
  • Your income is too high

Take Action Today

Joe Frick Law, PLLC is a small law firm. Because of this, we understand that you are an individual with unique needs and concerns – not just a case number. If you retain our experienced lawyers, you can be sure that we will give you and your case all of the individual attention it requires. Since every case is different, we will craft a solution to your financial problems that is just as unique as you are, instead of a “one size fits all” case strategy.

We won’t play games with your financial future, and we know exactly how to stand up to bullying creditors. If you are considering filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in the Treasure Valley or elsewhere in Idaho, contact us online or call us at 208-401-9311 today so that we can schedule a free initial evaluation of your case.

bankruptcy lawyer in idaho

A Bankruptcy Law Firm Serving the Treasure Valley – Joe Frick Law, PLLC

A Chapter 7 bankruptcy is no laughing matter – it is your financial future. Handled badly, it could devastate the lives of you and your dependents. If it is handled well, however, there is no need to panic, and there is no need to worry that you won’t be able to feed your family or pay your rent. Indeed, a Chapter 7 bankruptcy could represent a welcome fresh start in your life.

Essentially, Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a tradeoff – liquidation of your non-exempt assets in exchange for a debt discharge. Although your case will be adjudicated under federal law by a federal court, Idaho law applies in some instances, such as the types of exemptions for which you are eligible. A bankruptcy case can become complex, however, even if your debts and assets are few.

Bankruptcy court is no place to “go it alone”

To maximize your chances of fully protecting your interests, you will need an experienced bankruptcy attorney at your side. Joe Frick Law, PLLC can provide the missing piece needed to complete your bankruptcy puzzle. With offices in Nampa and Boise, we accept cases throughout the Treasure Valley and elsewhere in Idaho.

We will aggressively represent you, meticulously organize your case to make sure that none of your eligible debts will be left out, and ensure that you receive the maximum in Idaho bankruptcy exemptions so that you can keep as much of your property as possible. Most of all, we absolutely will not allow your creditors to take advantage of your distress.

Personalized Bankruptcy Counseling

In addition to helping you with the mechanics of filing for bankruptcy, we can use our understanding of the law to help you decide which option is right for you under your individual circumstances. In some cases, for example, Chapter 13 bankruptcy might be a better option, while in other cases private renegotiation of your debts with individual creditors might be the way to go.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy FAQs

What is the difference between a Chapter 7 and a Chapter 13 bankruptcy?

In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, your assets are liquidated to pay creditors, and you then receive a discharge of your unsecured debts even if they have not been fully paid. In a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you renegotiate your debt repayment plan and pay off your debts over three to five years.

 

Are any of my assets exempt from a Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Yes. Although Idaho has opted out of federal bankruptcy exemptions, Idaho exemptions do apply. Among these exemptions are:

  • The homestead exemption (up to $100,000 of your home equity)
  • Alimony and child support
  • Motor vehicle equity up to $7,000
  • One gun up to a value of $750
  • Household goods and furnishings up to a value of $7,500
  • Public assistance and social security
  • Many more items
Can I discharge all of my debts in Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Not necessarily. Certain debts cannot be discharged. Non-dischargeable debts include most secured debts, most student loans, alimony and child support, certain tax debts, and debts arising from fraudulent activity (such as writing a bad check).

 

Can my creditors come after me during Chapter 7 bankruptcy proceedings?

No, not as long as your bankruptcy petition is accepted by the court (sometimes it isn’t – please see below). Once the court accepts your petition, it will issue an automatic stay that suspends collection action by any creditor that has been included in your bankruptcy.

Can my Chapter 7 bankruptcy petition be rejected by the bankruptcy court?

Yes, your Chapter 7 petition can be rejected if, for example:

  • You have received a Chapter 7 discharge within the last eight years
  • You have received a Chapter 12 or Chapter 13 discharge within the last six years
  • You had another Chapter 7 petition dismissed within the last 180 days
  • Your income is too high

Take Action Today

Joe Frick Law, PLLC is a small law firm. Because of this, we understand that you are an individual with unique needs and concerns – not just a case number. If you retain our experienced lawyers, you can be sure that we will give you and your case all of the individual attention it requires. Since every case is different, we will craft a solution to your financial problems that is just as unique as you are, instead of a “one size fits all” case strategy.

We won’t play games with your financial future, and we know exactly how to stand up to bullying creditors. If you are considering filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in the Treasure Valley or elsewhere in Idaho, contact us online or call us at 208-401-9311 today so that we can schedule a free initial evaluation of your case.