Trusted Nampa and Boise, Idaho Bankruptcy Attorneys

Joe Frick Law, PLLC: A Bankruptcy Law Firm Serving the People of Idaho

You need not look at bankruptcy as some sort of final surrender – in fact, it could represent a brand-new start for you. While a badly managed bankruptcy can devastate your life, a well-managed bankruptcy could turn out to be the best financial move you could have made. The difference in many cases boils down to an understanding of Idaho bankruptcy law and how your finances fit into it.

Many important decisions await you – whether to file for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13, for example, or whether to simply forego bankruptcy and privately renegotiate your debts. You may also need to decide whether to file individually or jointly. These kinds of decisions can involve tremendous financial consequences and, as such, should not be taken lightly.

The bankruptcy system can “chew you up and spit you out” if you’re not ready for it

  • Imagine, for example, filing for Chapter 13 because you don’t want to lose your assets, only to have it involuntarily converted to Chapter 7 when the court determines that you are too poor to successfully complete a Chapter 13 repayment plan.
  • Imagine going through a Chapter 7 bankruptcy on your own, only to discover after your discharge that your spouse is still liable for all of your joint debts.
  • Imagine having your bankruptcy petition dismissed on a technicality and being barred from filing again for 180 days.

These are only three of the many potential pitfalls awaiting petitioners who fail to retain skilled legal counsel.

Meet Joe Frick

To optimize your results in the byzantine Idaho bankruptcy system, you will need a top-notch bankruptcy attorney on your side. As one of the few lawyers in Idaho to have been awarded a ”Superb” rating by the prestigious legal rating service Avvo, Joe Frick can help you safely navigate your way to a new financial future. Call today to set up a meeting with an experienced bankruptcy attorney.

Bankruptcy FAQs

What do I need to prove to win a negligence case, such as a car accident?

You need to prove three elements to win:

  • Negligence – existence of a duty of care plus breach of that duty
  • Causation – the defendant’s negligence caused the accident
  • Damages – expressed in monetary terms

Each of these elements must be proven with admissible evidence under a “more likely than not” standard.

What happens when I file a lawsuit?

The process works like this:

  • You initiate the lawsuit by filing a formal Complaint with the filing fee.
  • The court serves the Complaint and other paperwork on the defendant.
  • The defendant responds, typically with a formal Answer.
  • The parties commence the discovery process.
  • A trial is held.
  • An appeal is held, if either party requests one.
What is “discovery?”

Discovery is the process by which each party demands information and evidence from the other side (and sometimes third parties) in order to prepare for trial.

Discovery may include requests for documents, information provided under oath, and even physical evidence. Discovery can be enforced by court order.

 

What is arbitration?

Arbitration is a trial with a private “rent-a-judge” and simplified rules of procedure. If you sue a defendant over a dispute arising out of a contract, for example, the contract may have included an arbitration clause that requires arbitration of your dispute and prevents courtroom litigation. Arbitration decisions normally cannot be appealed.

What is the difference between suing an individual and suing a corporation?

When you win a lawsuit against an individual, you may normally collect your judgment out of all of that individual’s personal assets (although, in many cases, an insurance company will end up paying the judgment). When you win a lawsuit against the corporation, you generally cannot draw on the assets of the individual who owns the corporation – you can only draw on the corporation’s assets.

Joe Frick Law, PLLC: A Bankruptcy Law Firm Serving the People of Idaho

You need not look at bankruptcy as some sort of final surrender – in fact, it could represent a brand-new start for you. While a badly managed bankruptcy can devastate your life, a well-managed bankruptcy could turn out to be the best financial move you could have made. The difference in many cases boils down to an understanding of Idaho bankruptcy law and how your finances fit into it.

Many important decisions await you – whether to file for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13, for example, or whether to simply forego bankruptcy and privately renegotiate your debts. You may also need to decide whether to file individually or jointly. These kinds of decisions can involve tremendous financial consequences and, as such, should not be taken lightly.

The bankruptcy system can “chew you up and spit you out” if you’re not ready for it

  • Imagine, for example, filing for Chapter 13 because you don’t want to lose your assets, only to have it involuntarily converted to Chapter 7 when the court determines that you are too poor to successfully complete a Chapter 13 repayment plan.
  • Imagine going through a Chapter 7 bankruptcy on your own, only to discover after your discharge that your spouse is still liable for all of your joint debts.
  • Imagine having your bankruptcy petition dismissed on a technicality and being barred from filing again for 180 days.

These are only three of the many potential pitfalls awaiting petitioners who fail to retain skilled legal counsel.

Meet Joe Frick

To optimize your results in the byzantine Idaho bankruptcy system, you will need a top-notch bankruptcy attorney on your side. As one of the few lawyers in Idaho to have been awarded a ”Superb” rating by the prestigious legal rating service Avvo, Joe Frick can help you safely navigate your way to a new financial future. Call today to set up a meeting with an experienced bankruptcy attorney.

Bankruptcy FAQs

What do I need to prove to win a negligence case, such as a car accident?

You need to prove three elements to win:

  • Negligence – existence of a duty of care plus breach of that duty
  • Causation – the defendant’s negligence caused the accident
  • Damages – expressed in monetary terms

Each of these elements must be proven with admissible evidence under a “more likely than not” standard.

What happens when I file a lawsuit?

The process works like this:

  • You initiate the lawsuit by filing a formal Complaint with the filing fee.
  • The court serves the Complaint and other paperwork on the defendant.
  • The defendant responds, typically with a formal Answer.
  • The parties commence the discovery process.
  • A trial is held.
  • An appeal is held, if either party requests one.
What is “discovery?”

Discovery is the process by which each party demands information and evidence from the other side (and sometimes third parties) in order to prepare for trial.

Discovery may include requests for documents, information provided under oath, and even physical evidence. Discovery can be enforced by court order.

 

What is arbitration?

Arbitration is a trial with a private “rent-a-judge” and simplified rules of procedure. If you sue a defendant over a dispute arising out of a contract, for example, the contract may have included an arbitration clause that requires arbitration of your dispute and prevents courtroom litigation. Arbitration decisions normally cannot be appealed.

What is the difference between suing an individual and suing a corporation?

When you win a lawsuit against an individual, you may normally collect your judgment out of all of that individual’s personal assets (although, in many cases, an insurance company will end up paying the judgment). When you win a lawsuit against the corporation, you generally cannot draw on the assets of the individual who owns the corporation – you can only draw on the corporation’s assets.

bankruptcy lawyer in idaho

Joe Frick Law, PLLC: A Bankruptcy Law Firm Serving the People of Idaho

You need not look at bankruptcy as some sort of final surrender – in fact, it could represent a brand-new start for you. While a badly managed bankruptcy can devastate your life, a well-managed bankruptcy could turn out to be the best financial move you could have made. The difference in many cases boils down to an understanding of Idaho bankruptcy law and how your finances fit into it.

Many important decisions await you – whether to file for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13, for example, or whether to simply forego bankruptcy and privately renegotiate your debts. You may also need to decide whether to file individually or jointly. These kinds of decisions can involve tremendous financial consequences and, as such, should not be taken lightly.

The bankruptcy system can “chew you up and spit you out” if you’re not ready for it

  • Imagine, for example, filing for Chapter 13 because you don’t want to lose your assets, only to have it involuntarily converted to Chapter 7 when the court determines that you are too poor to successfully complete a Chapter 13 repayment plan.
  • Imagine going through a Chapter 7 bankruptcy on your own, only to discover after your discharge that your spouse is still liable for all of your joint debts.
  • Imagine having your bankruptcy petition dismissed on a technicality and being barred from filing again for 180 days.

These are only three of the many potential pitfalls awaiting petitioners who fail to retain skilled legal counsel.

Meet Joe Frick

To optimize your results in the byzantine Idaho bankruptcy system, you will need a top-notch bankruptcy attorney on your side. As one of the few lawyers in Idaho to have been awarded a ”Superb” rating by the prestigious legal rating service Avvo, Joe Frick can help you safely navigate your way to a new financial future. Call today to set up a meeting with an experienced bankruptcy attorney.

Bankruptcy FAQs

What do I need to prove to win a negligence case, such as a car accident?

You need to prove three elements to win:

  • Negligence – existence of a duty of care plus breach of that duty
  • Causation – the defendant’s negligence caused the accident
  • Damages – expressed in monetary terms

Each of these elements must be proven with admissible evidence under a “more likely than not” standard.

What happens when I file a lawsuit?

The process works like this:

  • You initiate the lawsuit by filing a formal Complaint with the filing fee.
  • The court serves the Complaint and other paperwork on the defendant.
  • The defendant responds, typically with a formal Answer.
  • The parties commence the discovery process.
  • A trial is held.
  • An appeal is held, if either party requests one.
What is “discovery?”

Discovery is the process by which each party demands information and evidence from the other side (and sometimes third parties) in order to prepare for trial.

Discovery may include requests for documents, information provided under oath, and even physical evidence. Discovery can be enforced by court order.

 

What is arbitration?

Arbitration is a trial with a private “rent-a-judge” and simplified rules of procedure. If you sue a defendant over a dispute arising out of a contract, for example, the contract may have included an arbitration clause that requires arbitration of your dispute and prevents courtroom litigation. Arbitration decisions normally cannot be appealed.

What is the difference between suing an individual and suing a corporation?

When you win a lawsuit against an individual, you may normally collect your judgment out of all of that individual’s personal assets (although, in many cases, an insurance company will end up paying the judgment). When you win a lawsuit against the corporation, you generally cannot draw on the assets of the individual who owns the corporation – you can only draw on the corporation’s assets.